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Engineer visit failed - Left two elderly vulnerable people unable to see family or order essentials

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Team Player

A Talk Talk engineer was supposed to install broadband today for my elderly vulnerable parents.

He called to say the road was closed. I explained that he could make a two minute detour to gain access. He said no, he'd already given the job back to Talk Talk and was on route to his next job, he wasn't prepared to try again. I explained that my parents were elderly and vulnerable, he said sorry but he wasn't prepared to try to help. He said he was working on strict instructions from Open Reach. "He was not to enter the property" 

I don't understand why this comment is relevant to him changing his route slightly to get there?

 

I thought that Open Reach / Talk Talk were prioritising vulnerable elderly people.

Please can someone help with this situation?

 

 

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Team Player

Just checked Open Reach policy, according to this engineer should have installed today;

BT's Openreach says it will no longer install new broadband connections when a home visit is involved.

The division, which runs the broadband network for a range of internet service providers, says it will now focus its efforts on other "essential work".

It means work to switch customers between suppliers will not be done if it requires engineers to enter a customer's house or flat.

But exceptions will be made for "vulnerable" users such as the elderly.

In addition, those who lack access to either a broadband or telephone connection, may still be served.

In these cases, the firm's engineers will be provided with protective equipment to reduce the risk of catching and spreading the virus.

Openreach says it will attempt to complete planned work when it does not involve entering premises. That means a failure in a streetside cabinet affecting a number of homes would still be fixed.

In addition, some customers will be able to install the necessary home equipment themselves.

"A large amount of the work we do can be completed outside, and we can often fix problems without entering a customer's property," explained a spokesman.

"So, we're advising our engineers not to complete any work inside a property unless it would leave a vulnerable customer with no form of connection, and it's not possible to provide one by any other means."